Alex Paul does a superb job of putting a war with enormous consequences into intimate focus. I read this book a few years ago, and its impact has stuck with me. “Suicide Wall” should be required reading for any politician who sends American men and women into harm’s way. Today, as our President considers the drawdown of forces in Afghanistan, the lessons of this book are more pressing than ever. I heartily recommend this book and applaud the author’s guts — and the cause he champions.

By Richard Speer

Any book about suicide is bound to be a struggle. On one hand you don’t want to make it feel like the only solution, and on the other you try to foregive yourself for not seeing those who use it as the only act left.

Mr. Paul succeeds on both acounts. By establishing the boundaries of ‘normal life’ for his characters by way of jobs and family, then uprooting the male characters to Reno, he creates a sense of the disoriented reality a draftee felt when they stepped on the bus to boot camp. He enhances the separation within the group of men by the way they respond to new challenges, i.e., gambling and women.

Only one man in the Reno group is a Vietnam Veteran, Mean Gene, who keeps a wall up between himself and the others. He is the person who qualifies for the ‘it is what it is’ designation from the others. He has the most relationship issues and work issues in a group sharing similar issues.

Suicide Wall succeeds in taking the Vietnam War out of the jungle and out of Washington D.C., and putting it on the road with the reader. Men of a certain age know more about Vietnam, from their service or their familiarity from living in the times, than they will ever say.

Alex Paul gives a voice to those men and women. Read Suicide Wall and listen carefully. This is their story, and yours too.

By David Gillaspie

My father, a Vietnam Vet, commited suicide in 2001. Reading this book was like looking into the mind of my father, what he was feeling and thinking during his difficult life. The book really opens your eyes to what the veterans go through, and the guilt of those who didn’t go. The US Gov. and Veterans affairs has a problem on their hands, and this book brings to light the outbreak of veteran suicides that has been kept quiet for so long. I strongly encourage everyone effected by any war to read this, and keep a box of tissues handy. It’s time the men and women who have fought for our country to be respected for ALL efforts given, and this book is an excellent beginning.

By Hillary Logsdon

This is a thought-provoking novel. I agree that we should erect a monument to honor EVERYONE who served in Viet Nam. Many have taken their lives since the war, many are struggling with the memories. The reader is drawn in to the story and can’t put it down ’til the end. This book will be appreciated by anyone who is friends or family of Vet, and I think it will get people talking about this neglected but important subject.

Any book about suicide is bound to be a struggle. On one hand you don’t want to make it feel like the only solution, and on the other you try to foregive yourself for not seeing those who use it as the only act left.

Mr. Paul succeeds on both acounts. By establishing the boundaries of ‘normal life’ for his characters by way of jobs and family, then uprooting the male characters to Reno, he creates a sense of the disoriented reality a draftee felt when they stepped on the bus to boot camp. He enhances the separation within the group of men by the way they respond to new challenges, i.e., gambling and women.

Only one man in the Reno group is a Vietnam Veteran, Mean Gene, who keeps a wall up between himself and the others. He is the person who qualifies for the ‘it is what it is’ designation from the others. He has the most relationship issues and work issues in a group sharing similar issues.

Suicide Wall succeeds in taking the Vietnam War out of the jungle and out of Washington D.C., and putting it on the road with the reader. Men of a certain age know more about Vietnam, from their service or their familiarity from living in the times, than they will ever say.

Alex Paul gives a voice to those men and women. Read Suicide Wall and listen carefully. This is their story, and yours too.

By Paul Anthony Rademacher

The unresolved issues of the Vietnam War have marked a generation. Many are still haunted by the decisions they were forced to make when facing death at such a very young age. How we acted and treated each other still hurts, yet we don’t know how to talk about it. Five Reno-bound guys, all with different experiences of the war, revisit their choices and deal with the aftermath of those decisions. Alex Paul spins a good yarn. The plot is lively and the characters believable, as they explore the gritty side of their Vietnam experiences. I think it would make a good movie(I’d like to see Gus Van Sant direct it). I would like to see the Suicide Wall erected.

By Linda Hughes

Alex Paul puts it squarely – the war in Southeast Asia left none of us untouched. All our legends died over there…the men who were killed and go on killing themselves are testimony to that fact. In this poignanat story of buddies getting together – living ‘normal’ lives after the war – the author presents a mirror for all of us to reflect on our collective loss, and pershaps look at how each of us felt, or “didn’t feel” about it. Suicide Wall is so homey and easy to read that the story’s ultimate impact becomes even more profound…its about all of us.

By Chuck Hills

It takes awhile to get you involved in to the story, but once you’re a part of it, you wont put the book down. On the back cover there is an interesting statistic that over 150,000 Vietnam veterans have committed suicide since the war. I wish the book would have spent more time in thoughts and past experiences of the veterans but instead it focused on a trip to Reno with five men getting away from their normal lives. I did learn a lot more than the facts from that are presented to you in textbooks and would recommend it to anyone who wants to know more about the Vietnam war.

By Elliott Smith